<HONEA EXPRESS: Blood is Thicker Than Walls

It finally happened. Honea Express has moved to greener pastures, or possibly just out to pasture -- you make the call.

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Saturday, September 30, 2006

Blood is Thicker Than Walls

We just returned from the wedding. It was a 4 hour drive, three with the wife driving. The wedding was at Bass Lake which is famous for, among other things, the filming of The Great Outdoors.

The wedding party and guests all stayed in cabins on the lake and generally drank too much and made more noise than is socially acceptable. It was a good time.

My "sermon" went smoothly enough, people laughed when they were supposed to and cried when they felt like it. I called the groom an insensitive pig and told the bride she looked hot. I did a shot of jager with the best man- you know, wedding stuff.

During the reception they passed around a microphone and a bunch of fellas with flowers in their shirts confessed they didn't know what to say and then proceeded to mumble generic sentiments and well-wishes. That's guy love.

One of the family members centered his point around the classic time-proven saying that "Blood is thicker than water", except either his aim was a little off, or his drink was a little on, because the version we all heard was that "blood is thicker than walls." I liked it. It had a nice ring to it.

Other than that it all went well and hitchless, I busted out my sprinkler and shopping cart moves, respectively. I did the s-s-s-s-afety dance. I owned that dance floor.

You are probably wondering how the hell we were able to do all of this and still maintain our amazing parenting duties. Well, we left the boys at home. It was the first time we've gone away kidless since Atticus was born.

It was bittersweet. We partied, we had fun, we were a couple without parental concerns. We missed the hell out of our kids.

We picked the boys up this afternoon. They greeted us with smiles and open arms. Leaving their grandparents house they fell asleep in our car to the smoothing rhythm of a familiar path, swaying in the comfort of their sleepy dance. A safety dance. They owned that backseat.

We are back now, in our house with its walls of brick and mortar, secure with the knowledge that our bond is thicker, and knowing that it makes our home all the stronger.